Search Results : Rayment

James Arthur Rayment

 
Birth Date:
6th September 1889
Death Date:
14th September 1973
Service Branch:
5th Field Company Australian Engineers
Service Number:
3106
Story:

James Arthur Rayment was born on 6th September 1889 at Balwyn in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. He was the fourth of eight children from the marriage of James Rayment and Harriet Ratten but was only eight years old when his mother Harriet died. Brought up by his father he did reasonably well at school, after leaving which he earned his living as a carpenter until (at the age of 26 and being still unmarried) he decided to join the Armed Forces following the lead of his younger brother William.

On 14th July 1915, he enlisted at Melbourne into the 5th Field Company Engineers and on 24th November 1915, after four months military training, he embarked on the ship HMAT (His Majesty’s Australian Transport) Ceramic, bound for the conflict in Europe.  He was first a sapper, then promoted to corporal, then acting sergeant in the field, then sergeant, then sergeant-major.  He was decorated, firstly for devotion to duty at all times and under all circumstances sometimes under shell fire, dated 14th June 1916, then again on 13th September 1916 ‘for gallant work at Pozieres on the night of the 3/4th August.- ‘Sergeant Rayment's section had to construct H.G. emplacements in the captured German trenches.  In one position which was swept with machine gun fire, he ordered the sappers to work in the trench and he took the risky work on top of the parapet and carried it out.  His work in laying out new work on the same night is to be highly commended’. 

Sadly it was only a couple of months after he was decorated for the second time that his younger brother William died from wounds received during the siege by the Ottoman Army of Kut-El-Amara in Iraq and a further two weeks later that his father died in Australia.

He was in Port Said in Egypt, Marseilles in France and Belgium and it was on 16th December 1916 whilst serving in France that he was awarded the MM (Military Medal).

James managed to survive the rest of the war, at the end of which he asked for free passage from England to Australia for his fiancé, and so it was on 12th June 1920 that he married Lilian Sarah Smith in Victoria, Australia. They had six children, one of whom, Kenneth Rayment, died as a Prisoner of War on the Burma Railway during the Second World War.

Having survived two World Wars, James died on 14th September 1973 at Tweed Heads in New South Wales, Australia, and was buried there aged 84.

Study Website:
http://www.rayment.info
Author:

James Frederick Rayment

 
Birth Date:
OCT 1873
Death Date:
10 DEC 1918
Service Branch:
"B" Company, 18th Battalion Rifle Brigade
Service Number:
200416
Story:

James Frederick Rayment was born at Hackney, London, in October 1873, the sixth and last child of an Essex born Blacksmith named Anthony Rayment and his wife Anne Rayment née Keeble.

James was only seven years old when his father died at the age of 54 leaving him, together with his three brothers and two sisters, to be brought up by his mother Anne alone.

After leaving school he appears to have tried several different jobs but eventually settled down to work in the printing business.

He married Mary Margaret Lloyd at St Thomas in Lambeth, Surrey, on 25 December 1893 when he was 20 years old and in October the following year the marriage resulted in the birth of a daughter Mary Eliza Annie.  In January 1901 however, after only 7 years of marriage, his wife Mary passed away at the relatively young age of 26.

It was nearly five years later, at the age of 32 that he married Fanny Rebecca Lloyd, this marriage taking place at St Barnabas Church in South Lambeth, London, on Christmas Day 1905, and the next year the marriage was blessed with a son James William David born on 7th August 1906.

At the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, James was still working as a Printer's Warehouseman at a General Printers and was living in a two-roomed house in Townsend Street, Southwark, London, with his wife and children when he decided to join the Army in order to "do his bit" and to see the World.

By this time he was more than forty years old but nevertheless he was accepted by the Army on 29th October 1914 when he signed up for the term of "one year or the duration of the war" having previously been a volunteer for the 2nd London Rifles.

On the 14th October the following year he was transferred to "B" Company of the 18th Battalion Rifle Brigade and just over one month later (on 25th November 1915) he found himself embarking at Devonport in Devon for service overseas.  He disembarked at Rangoon in Burma on 5th January 1916 and served there for the remainder of the war.

It is of course well known that fighting in The First World War officially ended at 11am on 11th November 1918 (the famous 11th hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month), but it is sometimes forgotten that deaths did not then end immediately.  So it proved in this case because, although James had managed to survive the conflict, it was not until 10th December 1918 (just four weeks after the Armistice) that he died at the age of 46 in Rangoon before he could be discharged from the Army.  Consequently his death was regarded as a war death and he was buried in Rangoon Cantonment Cemetery.

It was not until June 1922 that his widow Fanny, then living at Stockwell in South London, received his British War Medal.  The delay appears to have been caused by some rather sloppy record keeping on the Army's part, Private James Frederick Rayment having apparently been confused with another deceased soldier of the same name.

In 1948 his grave, together with the graves of 35 other Commonwealth servicemen who died in Rangoon during the First World War, was moved from its original location at the Cantonment Cemetery into the new Rangoon War Cemetery situated some 5 miles (8 kilometres) from the port at Rangoon, Burma (currently known as Yangon, Myanmar) and so he now lies in plot 4.G.5., where his grave is maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

There are no known photographs or pictures of James, but a photograph of his final resting place is shown above (left).

Study Website:
http://www.rayment.info
Author:

George Leslie Rayment

 
Birth Date:
AUG 1894
Death Date:
1976
Service Branch:
Australian Army 3rd Light Horse
Service Number:
3
Story:

George Leslie Rayment was born at Surrey Hills, Victoria, Australia in August 1894, the sixth child of James Rayment and Harriett Frances Rayment née Ratten.

His mother died in 1897 and his father then re-married because the children were still quite young and in obvious need of a mother.

After leaving school George became a Clerk until on 16th November 1914, nearly four months after the outbreak of the First World War, he enlisted at the age of 20 in the Australian Army 3rd Light Horse Postal Corps.

After just three months military training in Australia he embarked aboard the ship HMAT (His Majesty's Australian Transport) Star of Victoria on 25th February 1915 for the long sea voyage to Egypt via Colombo and Aden.

Following further training at Mena and Heliopolis, he landed at Gallipoli in May and served with the 3rd Light Horse Headquarters Brigade, of which he was appointed the Brigade Clerk in July 1915 and promoted to Corporal (photograph above left).

After four months active service in Gallipoli, during time which he experienced digging trenches, shortage of water, shellfire, Turkish attacks, snipers and lice, he contracted enteric fever and was then evacuated to London aboard the ship HS (Hospital Ship) Aquitania.

He soon found himself promoted to Temporary Staff Sergeant at "C" group Headquarters and was mentioned in dispatches, having been brought to the attention of the Secretary of State for War but was discharged on compassionate grounds following the death of his 54-year-old father in Melbourne on 27th November 1916 and the ensuing collapse of his stepmother.  Although a discharge on such grounds was not common, the military authorities had probably been swayed by the fact that, in addition to having now lost both his natural parents, he had also very recently lost a brother who had been badly injured whilst serving in Iraq and another of his brothers was missing in action.

Returning home to Australia he applied for work with the armed forces in Melbourne and on 6th July 1918 he married Celia Grace Lewis at Highfield Road Methodist Church in Surrey Hills, Victoria.  He and Celia had one child, a girl, who was born in 1923 but Celia died just four years later, leaving George alone to bring up their daughter.

He died in 1976 at Blackburn Victoria at the age of 82, thus being one of the lucky Rayments to have survived service in the First World War.

Study Website:
http://www.rayment.info
Author:

Robert Herbert Rayment

 
Birth Date:
1879
Death Date:
18 SEP 1916
Service Branch:
"C" Company, 6th Battalion London Regiment (City of London Rifles)
Service Number:
4871
Story:

Robert Herbert Rayment was born in London in the year 1879 and soon came to be known by his family and friends as "Bertie" in order to avoid confusion with his father, who bore the same first name as himself.  He was sixth of the eight children of Robert Rayment (a City of London chimney sweep) and Alice Mary Rayment née Bayly, but was their only son.

Having had a relatively uneventful childhood he left school and, like his four older sisters before him, he took up the occupation of Law Writer in the City of London.  None of his sisters or himself ever married and for many years they all lived happily together with both their parents, at a house in Clarence Place off Clapton Square in Hackney.

With the coming of the First World War "Bertie" served as a Rifleman in "C" Company, 6th Battalion London Regiment (City of London Rifles), but on 18th September 1916 tragedy struck when he died of wounds.  Although the records show him as aged 33 at the time of his death, this is clearly a mistake because he is known to have been born in the year 1879.

He was buried at St. Pierre Cemetery in Amiens, France and his grave (III C 6) was regularly visited by the rest of his family until such time as they each became either too old or too ill to carry on doing so.

His parents survived both him and Florence (one of his seven sisters) by a considerable number of years, but they never really got over the tragic loss of their only son.

With the death of his last surviving sister Ida on 4th November 1977, it is sad that all of the family records, photographs and mementos, including Bertie's war medals, simply disappeared!

Most of the above story only came to light because in late 1997, as part of the Rayment Society's One-Name Study programme, the author happened to have interviewed Bertie's second cousin, the late Miss Marjorie Rosina Rayment, who was the executrix and sole beneficiary of Ida's Will.

Study Website:
http://www.rayment.info
Author:

Thomas George Rayment

 
Birth Date:
NOV 1895
Death Date:
12 JUN 1917
Service Branch:
45th Australian Infantry Battalion
Service Number:
1982
Story:

Thomas George Rayment was born in November 1895 at Windeyer, New South Wales, Australia, to strict Methodists parents named Emily and Thomas George Rayment.  The fact that he and his father had exactly the same names quickly proved to be a source of more than a little confusion, as a result of which Thomas George Rayment (Junior) soon became known simply as "Tom Rayment" by almost everyone, including his parents.

Following the completion of his education at the local Windeyer Public School, he managed to find employment as a Grocer's assistant but after a few years he decided that, since the first World War was then raging and he was unmarried, there was a good opportunity for him to see the World and to "do his bit" alongside many other unmarried men.  Consequently on 21st February 1916 he went to Bathurst in New South Wales and there he enlisted in the Australian Army.

On 22 May 1916, after just three months military training, he and his Unit embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board the ship HMAT (His Majesty's Australian Transport) A69 Warilda, a 7713-ton vessel bound for the Western Front in Europe.

He saw nearly a year of action on the Western Front with the 45th Australian Infantry Battalion and on the afternoon of Thursday 7th June 1917 his unit were supporting the New Zealanders at a battle in Messines, Belgium when he was shot through the stomach whilst standing next to Sergeant B. Smith.  He fell to the ground without uttering a single word and was taken to number 2 Australian Casualty Clearing Station, where he died of his wounds on 12th June 1917, aged 21¾.

He was buried at Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension (Plot III, Row C, Grave No. 49) in France but is also remembered on the Australian National War Memorial at Treloar Crescent in Campbell, ACT.

Although there are no known photographs of him in his army uniform, a studio portrait of him that was made about a year prior to his enlistment in the 45th Australian Infantry Battalion is shown above (left).

Study Website:
http://www.rayment.info
Author:

Henry Robert Rayment

 
Birth Date:
07 OCT 1892
Death Date:
10 NOV 1917
Service Branch:
9th Battalion King’s Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment)
Service Number:
24755
Story:

Henry Robert Rayment (who came to be known by friends and family alike as "Bob") was born on 7th October 1892 at Bermondsey in London, the fifth son of Joseph Thomas Rayment, a foreman letter press compositor, and his wife Chrissie Ellen Rayment née Hayward.

When he was about four years old his family moved from London to Ulverston, a small town in Lancashire where his father had secured a job at the Otto printing works, and so it was in Ulverston that Bob later started school.

After leaving school he was apprenticed as a shoemaker at the Queenwood Company, a specialist Shoe Shop in the town, but it later suffered financial difficulties and went into liquidation.  He soon got work at the shoemaking department of the Co-operative Society where he completed his apprenticeship and remained until the First World War.

He was a member of the local Territorials and when the war broke out in 1914 he was at camp in Wales but within a few weeks he was shipped over to France where he served through some of the bloodiest battles of the War.

At about Eastertime in 1916 he returned from France as his time had expired (when joining the "Terriers" he had signed on for a limited period and this was now completed).  He was then a Sergeant and refused all offers to continue his service, as he had had more than enough of the war.

He took up his old job at the Co-op but it was only for about three months because he was then called up for service again.  He just told his mother that he had to go for a medical but in reality he knew that he would not return.  He was engaged to be married but being fully trained he was soon shipped off to Salonika as a Private in the 9th Battalion King’s Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment) and it was there in April 1917 that he was seriously wounded in the head by shrapnel.  

He was later moved to St. Elmo hospital in Malta but died there on 10th November 1917 after a risky operation to remove some of the shrapnel.  He was buried at the Pieta Military Cemetery in Malta aged 25.

Perhaps the saddest part of this whole story lies in the simple fact that, although he was in hospital for more than six months before he died, it proved impossible for his fiancé to visit him because of the war situation, and so they never actually saw each other again.

[The author is indebted to the late Frank Rayment, who was Bob's youngest brother and the author's fourth cousin once removed, for providing much of the above information.]

Study Website:
http://www.rayment.info
Author:

Reginald George Rayment

 
Birth Date:
24 JAN 1891
Death Date:
24 DEC 1916
Service Branch:
1st Battalion Grenadier Guards
Service Number:
25758
Story:

Reginald George Rayment was born on 24th January 1891 at Bengeo in Hertfordshire, England, the seventh and last child of a coachman named Isaac Rayment and his wife Jane Rayment née Knight.

Reginald married Ethel Mary Fortnum at St Michael and All Angels Church in Paddington, London on 2nd August 1913 and they then worked together at Hertford Castle, he as the Head Gardener and she as a Housemaid.

On 20th July the following year the marriage was blessed with their only child, a daughter whom they named Gladys May, but only four days later the First World War broke out.

Reginald tried to join the army but, having been rejected three times due to his varicose veins, he was finally accepted by the Grenadier Guards in May 1916.  By August 1916 he was a private fighting in France but then on 24th December that same year he was shot in the head and killed at the age of 26.

At the time of his death that Christmas Eve, his daughter Gladys was just two years old and in the breast pocket of his uniform he had been carrying a photograph of her, together with her mother Ethel and himself, at Hertford Castle.

Because of the nature of his injuries this family photograph taken at Hertford Castle was the only way in which his body could be readily identified, thus enabling him to buried later in the Guards Cemetery at Combles in Picardie, Northern France.

It is sad to relate that the crumpled photograph (shown above left) was said to have sustained most of its damage when Reginald's head was suddenly jerked backwards at the time that he met his death, but his daughter Gladys is known to have treasured it until she died almost one hundred years later.

On a lighter note, it is perhaps nice to know that the Magnolia trees that Reginald planted before the Great War can still be seen growing in the grounds of Hertford Castle.

Study Website:
http://www.rayment.info
Author:

William Charles Rayment

 
Birth Date:
22 JAN 1892
Death Date:
11 NOV 1916
Service Branch:
Australian Flying Corps
Service Number:
49
Story:

William Charles Rayment was born at Mount Duneed in Victoria, Australia on 22nd January 1892, the fifth of seven children of 29-year-old James Rayment and his wife Harriett Frances Rayment née Ratten.

His early life was not very easy, his mother having died when he was just five years old, but after leaving school he managed to get an apprenticeship as a heating engineer.

On 29th June 1915, at the age of 23 and after having spent six years as a heating engineer, he enlisted at Melbourne for service abroad in the Australian Flying Unit (a part of the Australian Imperial Force) and on 10th August 1915 he embarked at Melbourne aboard the ship RMS Persia bound for Asia Minor.

It was whilst serving as an Air Mechanic in No. 30 Squadron, Australian Flying Corps (AIF) at Kut-El-Amara, a town some 160 kilometres (about 100 miles) south of Baghdad in Iraq, that he was badly wounded during the famous siege of the town and was captured by the Ottoman Army and so became a POW (Prisoner of War).

Having been taken to Turkey with other POWs, he died in hospital from chronic nephritis on 11th November 1916 at Tarsus, Icel, Turkey, aged just 24 years, this being just 16 days before the death of his father James in Australia.  Although he was then buried at Tarsus War Cemetery in Turkey, his body (along with others) was exhumed in 1927 and re-buried at the North Gate War Cemetery in Baghdad, Iraq (pictured above left).  It has been claimed that this was done in order to secure the future maintenance and upkeep of the British war graves.

Never having been married he has no descendants but his grave is now very well tended by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Study Website:
http://www.rayment.info
Author:

Herbert Charles Rayment

 
Birth Date:
8 Jan 1890
Death Date:
30 Jan 1917
Service Branch:
7th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, City of London Regiment
Service Number:
61336
Story:

Herbert Charles Rayment, the third son of William Frank Rayment (a maltster) and Emily Rayment (née Fisher), was born on 8th January 1890 in the small village of Aspenden, which is situated just south of the town of Buntingford in Hertfordshire, England.

A gardener, he lived in Aspenden for many years and on 3rd August 1914, at the age of 24, he married a local domestic servant named Kate Tew in Layston Parish Church.

Enlisting in the army at Buntingford, he served firstly as a private in the 4th Essex Regiment (service number number 4030) but later transferred to the 7th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, City of London Regiment (Regimental Number 61336) and it was whilst serving in the latter that he was killed in action at the Somme on 30th January 1917.

He is buried in plot I, row H, grave number 14 at Varennes Military Cemetery on the Somme in France and his name also appears on the local War Memorial located at Market Hill in Buntingford.

Although he never had any children his name is remembered to this day because, in his honour, East Hertfordshire Council allocated the name Rayment Close to one of the roads in a new residential development at Buntingford.  Nineteen dwellings were constructed in 2016 by Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd. in Rayment Close, which is situated to the east of the town centre on land to the north of the existing Hare Street Road.

Unfortunately no photographs of Herbert Charles Rayment appear to have survived, but if one ever comes to light, the Rayment Society would be more than interested!

Study Website:
http://www.rayment.info
Author: